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China Negotiation Training

3 Negotiating Takeaways from the NK Coal Boat Maneuver

Win-Win with Chinese Characteristics

The new US administration seemed to score a big coup in Asia last week, when China blocked a fleet of North Korean cargo ships carrying coal to Chinese markets. On the surface, it seemed a perfect win-win for both Washington and Beijing.

North Korea Coal BoatsIt turned out, however, that the Chinese policy had already been in place since mid February – in response to UN pressure after the earlier round of Pyongyang missile tests.  It’s still a powerful win-win deal, but now with Chinese characteristics: Beijing wins when they agree to the policy, and Beijing wins again when they implement.  

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Three Negotiating Issues to Watch at the Xi Trump Meeting

The upcoming Xi – Trump meeting is the first face-to-face sit down between the two leaders.  The US side has been clear about what it wants from China, but it’s not quite as clear what it plans on offering.  Don’t get distracted by the background noise like Tillerson’s visit  or uninformed “princeling” gossip.  This is all about the relationship between 2 leaders.

Every negotiation is a competition between two narratives

The Trump story is entitled “Make America Great Again” – but the plot is a muddle of victimhood (China is bullying America) and bravado (unilateral action on North Korea).  Xi Jinping’s narrative is “The Chinese Dream” which juxtaposes a need for global respect with insistence on non-confrontation – all wrapped around one of the largest projections of power since the early Ming (OBOR, 9 Dash Line).

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The Future of US-China Commercial Relations: Welcome to the Multiconomy

Takeaway – Established Western brands will continue to defend their global leadership positions for a while yet, but Chinese corporates are taking control of growing niches and new categories. Look for Chinese entities to disrupt industries through enforced localization and substitution – not head-to-head competition.

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Welcome to the Multiconomy

Phase 1: Frenemies on a Glass Bridge

The status quo of US – China commerce can best be described as frenemies who need each other more than they like each other.  Up until now, both Chinese and Western commercial systems have been multi-faceted and opportunistic. National policies have been one of many inputs in business decision-making.

US China Relations are like a glass bridgeThis situation can be characterized as brittle, but not necessarily fragile. Think of our existing system as a strong glass bridge. It’s very stable – right up until the moment it starts to crack. Then it can no longer support its own weight, but is very difficult to repair.

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5 Negotiating Lessons from Sec. of State Tillerson’s Beijing Trip

That treacherous opening Chinese toast.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson made his first official visit to China last weekend, and the White House probably sees it as one of the bright spots in a rocky transition. His Beijing hosts, however, will view the meet as a major step towards their goal of regional hegemony and global respect. Like many western execs before him, Sec. Tillerson doesn’t seem to understand what the Chinese believe he’s agreed to.

This was how the new Sec of State described the US China relationship in January:

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Last Man Standing Part 3: POV Counts.

POV counts. Chinese have opinions too.

In US China negotiation, POV changes everything.
POV changes everything in negotiation

Some westerners are pushing back against the idea that we are facing the risk of rising trade barriers or a breakdown in orderly trade regimes. Their logic is that, “The US has a lot of levers, and we can assert our rights without necessarily sparking a trade war that the Trump Administration doesn’t want.” Not wrong, but it makes the dangerous assumption that trade relations are going to be something Washington stays in control of.

Trade frictions almost always take on a life of their own due to a single inconvenient point: Both sides in a dispute get an opinion. If you don’t know the other guy’s point of view (POV) then you have absolutely no control over the final result.

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China and the Unpredictable Negotiator

Chinese negotiators tend to shift from guanxi-seeking partner to cut-throat competitor mode when confronted with an unpredictable counter-party.

Chinese negotiations usually follow one of two paths – towards long-term partnership or one-off competition.  What’s the difference?  You are.  If a Chinese counter-party feels that he can do better as a long-term partner, that’s what he’ll go after. If he feels that you won’t honor the terms and obligations of a durable & profitable relationship, he’ll go for your throat.

China and the unpredictable negotiatorChinese institutions are known for their long memories, and well after members of the new administration have forgotten their twitter tirades and decided to “move on and get on with business,” American firms will still face increased scrutiny, hostility, and non-economic barriers.

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Lessons from the G20 for “Regular” Negotiators

China’s treatment of the U.S. delegation as President Obama arrived at the G20 conference sparked controversy and a firestorm of international criticism. There are some great lessons here for front-line negotiators involved in cross-border deals.

Barack Obama ‘deliberately snubbed’ by Chinese in chaotic arrival at G20 – The Guardian

The US president was denied the usual red carpet welcome and forced to ‘go out of the ass’ of Air Force One, observers say

China chides media’s hype of G20 spat – Global Times

Overblown reports show arrogance: foreign ministry

Lessons from the G20 “tarmac row”

The conflict may or may not have been serious – but it was real. It says a lot about both the US and Chinese cultures. The Chinese infuriated the world with their hostile behavior. (Don’t be politically correct and insist on saying “perceived hostility”. Many people were angered by the way national security adviser Susan Rice was treated on that airport tarmac, and you may have been one of them. Own it.)  We infuriate the Chinese by talking about it publicly.

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A Survival Course in Cross Culture Negotiating, with special guest Andrew Hupert

I’ll be speaking at Lohaus’ cross-culture series this coming Tues, April 7 in Shanghai.  Here are the details:

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

 to 

LOHAUS

50 Yongjia Road
Xuhui District
Shanghai (map)

A Survival Course in Cross Culture Negotiating, with special guest Andrew Hupert

Tuesday, Apr 7, 2015, 7:00 PM

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General Principles are the Terms and Conditions page of Chinese Negotiation

In Chinese negotiation, don’t confuse polite rhetoric with concerted strategy.

American and European negotiators treat their Chinese counterparties’ “general principles” discussion like the “terms and conditions” screen – we just check the box and look for the real content. Big mistake.

General Principles Discussion can come back to haunt careless negotiators

10 China Negotiating Mistakes - Buy the eBook on Kindle
Learn from the expensive mistakes of expats who have come before you.

Westerners in China often make important concessions without even knowing it. It’s common for Chinese negotiators to frame their position with a discussion of “general principles”. Westerners tend to shrug them off with vague agreement – particularly since these conversations tend to be phrased in vague, wooden rhetoric like “harmony and shared responsibility”. It all sounds like meaningless propaganda to us, and it mixes easily with the toasts, proverbs, unfamiliar historic references and folksy anecdotes that characterize a boozy banquet night in Shanghai or Beijing. Western negotiators tend to focus on transactions, and aggressive negotiators will make every effort to control the negotiating agenda and nail down concrete deal points – but the Chinese side never gives up on their deal points or general goals, regardless of the appearance of compromise or concession.

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Microsoft Fails by Trying to Coast on Past Successes in China

Relationship Building Not a One-Off Activity in China

10 China Negotiating Mistakes - Buy the eBook on Kindle
Learn from the expensive mistakes of expats who have come before you.

In ChinaSolved’s latest book, “10 Common China Negotiating Mistakes”, 3 on the least wanted is “coasting on good starts and early successes”.  While this is one of the biggest dangers that deep-pocketed MNCs (and their representatives” face in a long-term China business, it can be very hard to anticipate.  Fortunately for us (but unfortunately for them), Microsoft provides a telling case study of how the best efforts don’t always yield successful outcomes.

At the end of May, 2014, the Chinese government’s procurement office announced a ban on MS Windows 8 – the latest generation of the Redmond giant’s operating system and greatest hope of making the leap to touch-screen tablets and mobile devices.

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